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Eligibility

The following guidelines provide eligibility requirements for attractions, facilities and services in the Tourist Attraction Signs, Community Entrance Signs, and Community Services Signs programs.

Although a tourist operator or business may be deemed to be eligible under these guidelines, other factors, such as having limited space on the roadside, may prohibit the business from receiving a tourist attraction or essential services sign.

The online Application is the easiest way to determine your eligibility.

For further details on eligibility requirements, please Contact Us.

Tourism Criteria

Tourist Areas

Six Tourism Destination Regions (TDR’s) in the province receive annual funding from Alberta Economic Development to support marketing and operations within their regions. The TDR’s include: Alberta Central, Alberta North, Alberta South, Calgary, Edmonton, and the Canadian
Rockies.

Within the boundaries of the six TDR’s, there are Destination Marketing Organizations (DMO’s) active in marketing their region locally, nationally and internationally. In many cases, the activities of the DMO’s play a key role in the overall marketing plan of their respective TDR.
Examples of DMO’s include: Kalyna Country, Mighty Peace Tourist Association and Chinook Country Tourist Association.

Transitional / gateway signage opportunities are provided at major entry and exit points on major and minor highways to welcome and advise motorists they are entering a tourism marketing area.

Visitor Information Centres

Visitor Information Centres serve as important venues in promoting attractions, accommodations and services to visitors who are entering the province, tourist region or municipality. They are generally located at critical highway access points at provincial gateways, entering tourism regions and areas, and within municipalities that are formally recognized by Travel Alberta marketing literature.

Visitor Information Centres provide a one-stop location for motorists to become educated on the various tourism attractions and services available in the area.

Significant Parks and Recreation Areas

Parks and Recreation Areas meeting provincial status are included in this category. These parks and recreation areas, both public and private, have significant natural amenities and may contain recreational and other types of attractions within their boundary. Examples may include William Switzer Provincial Park, Kananaskis Country and Pine Lake Recreation Area.

Destination Resort Areas

Destination Resort Areas are self-contained developments that provide visitor-oriented fixed roof accommodations and developed recreational/attraction facilities in a setting with high natural amenities. These attractions have physical and administrative boundaries defining its management, and images/perceptions defining its market competitiveness.

Resort visitors find that their range of needs can be met by the attractions, accommodations and services provided within the physical confines of the destination resort. Accommodations are not the focal point of the resort, but rather the natural and man-made attractions and recreational/leisure activities available at the property. Major Resort Areas have a distinct geographic location, and situated to take advantage of natural, historic and recreational attractions.

Known examples of a Destination Resort include Three Sisters Resort and Silver Tip Resort in Canmore.

Destination Attraction Sites

Destination Attraction Sites are world renown or must see attractions that are formally recognized by the province and/or Travel Alberta. The destinations attract significant numbers of travelers whose planned trip ends within or at the destination area or attraction site. This category covers significant tourism classified areas and sites within the province. The attraction itself is the primary trip purpose for the majority of customers that visit. Examples of Destination Attraction Sites include:

  • UNESCO World Heritage Sites such as Dinosaur Provincial Park and Head Smashed in Buffalo Jump
  • West Edmonton Mall
  • Royal Tyrell Museum of Paleontology

Tourist Attractions (Businesses and Facilities)

Tourist attractions are considered a tourism business or facility if tourism is clearly the core business activity. To qualify, the attraction must meet the following general criteria:

  • Provide a substantive tourism experience in addition to, or as part of any commercial/retail nature of the establishment. The emphasis is on the provision of an “experience” versus the delivery of a local/and or community service. The intent is to provide signage for attractions that have regional/provincial, national or international appeal;
  • Have all relevant government licenses and approvals to operate as a tourist attraction, service and/or facility, including health, development planning and parking requirements;
  • Be appropriately signed within the property line so visitors know they have arrived at their destination;
  • Have appropriate on-route directional signage off the highway to provide positive guidance to the place of business;
  • Be open to the general public. At a minimum, facilities will be open 3 days a week, 8 hours a day, and be open 12 consecutive weeks during the operating season;
  • Comply with all municipal, provincial and federal laws regarding health, public safety, business operations etc;
  • Maintain washroom facilities as required by health authorities;
  • Provide adequate parking;
  • Have a controlled gate, staffed orientation/reception point, or permanent interpretation panels/display; and,
  • Serve transient customers and be open to the general public.
  • Attractions need to be located in a rural address or within the legal limits of an community that has a population base of 100 to 25000 people.

The tourism attraction must be listed in an official travel guide, entered into Travel Alberta’s Tourist Information System, or is a legitimate operation recognized by the relevant industry association. If the business chooses not to be officially listed, they must prove their profile as a tourism operator and provide evidence of having their tourism attraction or service profiled in tourism marketing literature. The applicant could be required to sign an affidavit verifying that it meets the requirements of a legitimate tourism operator.

Tourist Attractions include commercial (for profit) and non-commercial (non-profit / community owned) operated tourism attractions that provide visitors with an experience in Heritage or Historical, Recreational, Entertainment, Natural, Cultural, Education and Scientific activities.

A categorized listing of the available attraction types is included in Table 1.

Accessibility

Eligible businesses that qualify under the tourism sign guidelines are encouraged to keep in mind the needs of motorists who may have physical disabilities, through:

  • Meeting current building codes;
  • Consider installing public access to a Teletype Telephone;
  • Provide a wheelchair accessible facility including designated stalls in the parking area, easy access into the building and accessible washroom facilities; and
  • Prominently display the blue and white wheelchair symbol on relevant signs.

It is also recommended that they maintain national uniformity in addressing accessibility needs and access. More information on accessibility is available on the Alberta Transportation website.

Tourist Attraction Categories

Attraction CategoryDescription
Recreational AttractionsRecreational resources provide either active or passive outdoor recreational experiences directly dependent upon the natural or man-made elements of the landscape. These attractions must have an appeal to visitors beyond the local community, and that the category does not include facilities that are merely local or community “service providers”.

Recreational Attractions Examples: Touring – Boat Tours and Charters; Air (fixed wing) Tours; Helicopter Tours; Dog Sledding Tours Outdoor Experience – Hiking Trails / Backpacking (Staging Areas); All Terrain Vehicle Areas; Recreational Scuba Diving Centres; Heli-Skiing; Whitewater Rafting; Skiing (Alpine or Downhill); Cattle Drives; Skiing (Nordic or Cross-Country); Fishing/Hunting / Outpost Lodges; Snow Boarding/ Tobogganing; Outfitter (angling / hunting/outback camping / eco-tourism) Outdoor Activities – Golf Course (Public); Snowmobile Areas (Staging Areas); Campgrounds (Public); Water Slide / Water Theme Parks; RV Parks; Resorts; Picnic Areas; Stocked Fish Pond; Public Beach
Heritage and Historical Attractions Heritage and Historical Attractions represent distinctive physical elements in the landscape, either natural or manmade, that reflect the human actions in relation to past events, sites or structures. They may include buildings, aboriginal habitations, trails, structures, replicas, settlement patterns and landscapes.
This category also includes attractions with an archeological focus. These resources embody the physical evidence or remains of known historic or prehistoric human life, activity or culture in Alberta. They may include significant ruins, artifacts, inscriptions and, structural or human remains. They differ from historical resources in that they may have existed before written records were kept in an area.

Heritage/Historical Attraction Examples: Historic Sites; Historic / Heritage Villages or Buildings;
Interpretive Centres; Public Archives; Museums (artifacts); Archeological Sites; Points of Interest (Plaques / Cairns); Community Museums.
Cultural AttractionsCultural Attractions include attractions that express traditions, aesthetics, values and customs passed along from generation to generation. They may include components such as crafts, music, arts, dance or drama, rituals, tribal customs, festivals, languages, interpretive centres, foods and special events.
Cultural Attraction Examples – Aboriginal Displays / Interpretive Centre; Artisan Demonstrations; Western Getaway; Cultural Centre; Unique Displays (i.e.; Largest Perogy); Sports Hall of Fame; Murals; Public Art Galleries; Interpretive Craft Centre; Tea House; Performance Theatre; Historical Theatre

Natural Attractions include attractions that occur naturally in the environment. Examples include wetlands, marshes, geological features, forests, landforms or topography, as well as water bodies and vegetation that are indigenous and characteristic of Alberta and its differing regions.
This category also includes scenic attractions that may include a combination of natural and manmade features that give remarkable character to the visual landscape. These resources are striking in appearance and provide a pleasing and memorable experience for viewers.
The facilities must be accessible to the traveling public off the provincial highway network, and have the necessary support infrastructure to accommodate the traveling public (proper access/egress off highway system, parking, and interpretive signage).

Natural Attraction Examples: Developed Natural Site: Local Parks; Scenic Lookout; Forest, Wood or Tree Related; Conservation Areas Natural; Hot or Mineral Spring; Wildlife Viewing; Display Garden; Botanical Garden; Natural Sites & Trails
Entertainment AttractionsEntertainment Attractions include attractions whose sole purpose is to provide visitors with an experience that typically involves amusement, pleasure, fun and/or excitement. These attractions provide a type of diversion or past time that visitors to an area can pursue during their stay. They are usually man-made facilities, and are designed for audiences beyond just the local community. They have regularly scheduled programs, services and events that are available to the traveling public. The intent is on the provision of an experience as opposed to being merely a “service provider” for the local/regional community and traveling public.

Entertainment Attraction Examples: Casino; Alberta approved Farmers’ Markets; Live Theatre; Steam Train / Tram Way; Raceways/Motor Speedways; Theme (Amusement) Park; Shopping/Tourist Districts; Game Farm
Natural AttractionsNatural Attractions include attractions that occur naturally in the environment. Examples include wetlands, marshes, geological features, forests, landforms or topography, as well as water bodies and vegetation that are indigenous and characteristic of Alberta and its differing regions.
This category also includes scenic attractions that may include a combination of natural and manmade features that give remarkable character to the visual landscape. These resources are striking in appearance and provide a pleasing and memorable experience for viewers.
The facilities must be accessible to the traveling public off the provincial highway network, and have the necessary support infrastructure to accommodate the traveling public (proper access/egress off highway system, parking, and interpretive signage).

Natural Attraction Examples: Developed Natural Site: Local Parks; Scenic Lookout; Forest, Wood or Tree Related; Conservation Areas Natural; Hot or Mineral Spring; Wildlife Viewing; Display Garden; Botanical Garden; Natural Sites & Trails
Educational AttractionsEducational Attractions include both natural and manmade attractions whose primary aim is to provide visitors with learning and or enrichment opportunities from a social, business/industrial, cultural, and scientific or historical perspective. The intent is to provide an experience that provides visitors with the opportunity to develop/acquire knowledge, skills or abilities. Interpretation, from a learning or educational perspective, must be provided either through print material, signs, guides/interpreters or special programming (i.e. seminars, class room instruction). The latter must be offered in a regularly scheduled manner, and be accessible to the travelling public.

Educational Attraction Examples: Visitor Interpretive Centre; Industrial Plant Tours; Zoo / Animal Display; Fish Hatcheries; Petting Zoo; Interpretive Hikes / Tours; Farm Tours; Planetarium; Sight Seeing: Conservation Areas; Scenic Tours; Wineries; Theme Parks; Industrial Interpretative Centre
Alternate Tourist AccommodationThe intent of Alternative Tourist Accommodations is to provide an experience over and above general lodgings in a unique setting. These facilities should also include other tourism-related amenities and activities, in addition to the accommodation component. This category is limited to alternate accommodations outside the parameters of essential services (gas, food lodging) requirements. Facilities must have a minimum of four guest rooms to be eligible

Alternate Tourist Accommodation Examples: Country Lodges; Bed & Breakfast; Farm & Ranch Vacations; Hostels; Guest Ranches; Wilderness Lodges
Tourist RetailTourist retail businesses are business whose products are unique and primarily sold to tourists and visitors from outside the immediate area. These tourist retail venues provide sufficient size, variety and selection of outlets to be attractive to tourists. Farm Retail or Fruit & Vegetable stands need to be supported by a permanent business location, which provides access, parking and washroom facilities.

Tourist Retail Examples: Farm Direct Marketing, Farm Gate Retail, Market Gardens, U-Pick, Hand Crafts

Essential Services (Gas, Food, Lodging)

Business are considered an essential service provider if their main commercial venture is the provision gas, food or lodging services to travelling tourists. To qualify, the essential service provider must meet the following general criteria:

  • Open to the general public and provide essential service needs of travelers while outside their normal place of work and residence;
  • Majority of customers are passing motorists who need to fuel-up, eat or rest;
  • Have all relevant government licences and approvals to operate as a business, including health, development planning and parking requirements;
  • Toilet/Washroom and drinking water facilities are maintained at a standard required by local and provincial health authorities;
  • Comply with all municipal, provincial and federal laws regarding health, public safety, business operations, etc;
  • Be appropriately signed within the property line to be recognized by passing motorists;
  • Have gas pumps, a sit-down restaurant and/or overnight shelter; and
  • Provide reasonable access to a public telephone during hours of operation.

Specific Requirements

Specific requirements when providing services under the gas, food and lodging categories include:

Gas

  • Provide gasoline, oil, water and pressurized air for automobile use; and
  • Continuous service (minimum 8 hours) during normal highway business hours (7:00 a.m. to 11:00p.m.)

Food

  • Provide adequate seating capacity to meet the needs of the traveling public; and
  • Continuous food service (minimum 8 hours) during normal highway business hours (7:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m.)

Lodging

  • Approved accommodation by the Alberta Hotel and Lodging Association, or alternatively an approved national accommodation rating agency;
  • Access to check-in service 24 hours a day;
  • Lockable door for each unit; and
  • Restroom, with hot and cold water, and bath or shower facilities in each unit.

Logos signs will also be permitted for “Other Businesses.” Any business located within the corporate limits or town boundary of a community is eligible to be on the Other Businesses Logo sign. Logo sign panels are permitted on a first-come, first-serve basis.

Accessibility

Eligible businesses that provide essential services are encouraged to keep in mind the needs of motorists who may have physical disabilities, through:

  • Meeting current building codes;
  • Consider installing public access to a Teletype Telephone;
  • Provide a wheelchair accessible facility including designated stalls in the parking area, easy access into the building and accessible washroom facilities

It is also recommended that they maintain national uniformity in addressing accessibility needs and access. More information on accessibility is available on the Alberta Transportation website.

General Facilities and Services

General service symbols are often placed on tourist attraction signs or community entrance signs to communities, to quickly and easily display the available services for that attraction or community. For example, an attraction sign having a tent symbol, picnic table symbol, grocery cart symbol, and wheelchair symbol would signify the facility has a facility for tent camping, day-use picnic area, grocery store and is wheelchair accessible.

Similarly, a police shield symbol and question mark symbol placed below the community name sign indicates that community has access to a police station and information centre.

The general facility or service provider must meet the following general criteria:

  • Open to the general public and provide general service needs of travelers while outside their normal place of work and residence;
  • The symbol used is an accurate depiction of the on-site facility or service that is provided;
  • The facility or service must possess all relevant government licences and approvals for operation, including health, development planning and parking requirements;
  • Toilet/Washroom and drinking water facilities are maintained at a standard required by local and provincial health authorities, where required by local regulations;
  • Comply with all municipal, provincial and federal laws regarding health, public safety, business operations, etc;
  • Businesses need to be located in a rural address or within the legal limits of an community that has a population base of 100 to 25000.

General symbols are typically not used as stand alone attraction signs; however, there may be a highway operational need in certain instances when there is no name or identification associated with the facility or service. Examples where these symbols may be used include directions to parking lot areas, telephones, stand-alone public washrooms, fishing ponds, etc. located near the highway. The operational need and use of these stand-alone symbols are outside the TODS program, and can be requested through one of the local Transportation District Offices.

Sign Location Criteria

Sign Placement

The location of a tourist attraction or services business should be a primary consideration at the time of initial business planning. Roadside signing should not be expected to compensate for a poorly located business.

Signs should be carefully positioned so that:

  • They do not obstruct a driver’s view of the road or intersection;
  • They do not obstruct traffic or pedestrians;
  • They do not form a confusing background to normal regulatory traffic signs and signals;
  • They are not mounted with directional signs; and
  • They do not heavily impact on visual amenity, particularly in environmentally and visually sensitive locations.

In areas where the placement of a TODS or Logo Sign causes an operational or safety problem, as determined by the District Operations Manager, the sign will not be permitted, or the request will be placed on hold until the operational or safety problem can be resolved. The Operations Manager responsible for operations and safety on Alberta highways will establish the exact location of signs on the highway, including the need for adjusting other adjacent signs at the turn or exit, where necessary.

Number of Signs

To prevent proliferation of signs and to ensure commercial equity, there is a limit to the number of tourist and services signs that will be permitted inside the highway right-of-ways. The following limitations are used for the number of signs approaching a rural intersection, exit ramp or turn:

  • Maximum 2 Type A TODS (including Destination Areas, Destination Attractions, Visitor Information Centres and Attractions)
  • Maximum 2 Type B TODS (Max. 3 panels for each sign)
  • Maximum 1 Gas Logo Sign (Max 6 logo panels)
  • Maximum 1 Food Logo Sign (Max 6 logo panels)
  • Maximum 1 Lodging Logo Sign (Max 6 logo panels)
  • Maximum 1 Community Attraction & Facility Signs (approaching a community access – Max. 1 for left turn and Max. 1 for right turn), Max. 4 attractions and 6 symbols placed below the community name sign.

In urban areas, a significant number of regulatory, warning and guide signs may exist. For this reason, the number of TODS signs permitted approaching an urban intersection will be determined on a caseby-case basis depending on the available space. Signage will be permitted on a first-come, first-serve basis, and at the discretion of the District Operations Manager.

Location Criteria

Tourism Signage Highway Classification System

The provincial highway network is classified according to the type of highways and its intended functions. Tourism signs are strategically placed on the network to provide directions to motorists looking for tourist destinations.

The hierarchy and purpose of each highway type is outlined below:

Major Highway (Inter-Provincial Routes)
  • Consist of national and inter-provincial travel routes in Alberta, including ring roads in major cities.
  • Carry significant tourist traffic between neighboring provinces, territories and the United States.
  • Connect major population centres throughout the province.
  • Comprise a large percentage of multi-lane high speed highways with high mobility function.
  • Consist mainly of long-distance trips between origin and destination.
Major Highway (Inter-Regional Routes)
  • Consist of major tourism travel routes from and to destination areas and regions within the province.
  • Provide connection between major highways where mobility and land access are of equal importance.
  • Include large percentage of two-lane undivided (conventional) highways.
  • Provide equal importance to high mobility and land access.
  • Encompass medium to long distance travel, including “back road” trips
Minor Highways (Regional Routes)
  • Consist of minor routes that connect local development sites to the Major Highway network.
  • Provide greater emphasis on land access and less on mobility.
  • Involve short trips from the Major Highway turn-off to the local destination site.
  • Comprise a high percentage of low volume two-lane undivided highways, local roads and access roads.
Tourist Highway Classification Map

TODS Placement Criteria

Sign Classification

The type of signs placed within the highway network is a reflection of the needs of the facility, as well as a function of letter height to properly read the sign at high speed. In low speed, well-developed environments, large signs with large text are not necessary or desirable. The placement criteria are broken into rural areas, small communities (less than 25,000 population) and large communities (greater than 25,000 population). For each area, consideration is also given to whether the sign is placed on a high speed road (80 km/h or greater) or a low speed road (70 km/h or less).

Three types of signs, identified as Types A, B and C are provided for Tourist Oriented Directional Signs (TODS) to suit the environment in which they are placed. Type A, B and C signs are outlined below. The placement of each type of TODS sign, based on the driving environment in which they are placed, is outlined in Table 3.

Classification of TODS Signs

Type A TODS (Major Signs)
Type B TODS (Regular Signs)
Type C TODS (Trail Blazers)

Table 3: TODS Sign Type Placement

Notes:

  1. Facility signs may be incorporated into overhead or ground-mounted directional (green) guide signs.
  2. Limited to the selected attractions/facilities displayed on the Community Attractions and Facility Sign.
  3. For attractions located in large communities:
    • Edmonton / Calgary / Red Deer / Lethbridge / Medicine Hat / Grande Prairie / Airdrie / Leduc / Ft. McMurray / Sherwood Park / St. Albert – not eligible under the Tourism Highway Signage Program. All signing would fall under city jurisdiction.
    • All communities with population bases exceeding 25,000 are not eligible for signage under the Tourism Highway Signage Program.
  4. Major / Minor highways are shown in the Tourism Highway Map outlined in Figure 1.

TODS

Distance Criteria for Attractions

The TODS distance criteria is outlined in Table 4. The distance criteria consider whether the attraction is located in a rural area or within a community. Attractions are categorized into Destination Areas &
Attractions, and Attractions. The maximum distances shown in the table are the radial distances (as the crow flies) from the attraction to the first directional sign encountered by the motorist. Directional signs must be placed at all turns to the attraction between these two points, including local roads. Note: The owner of the attraction will require approval from the local road authority for placing signs at turns on local roads.

Signing is permitted in each direction at any highway within 15 kms of the attraction. If there are numerous highways within 15 km, signage may be placed at each if desired by the facility owner.
Where no highways are within 15 km, signage may be placed in each direction at the closest highway junction only, regardless of the distance from the facility.

Table 4: Distance from Attraction for TODS

Notes: All distances from attractions are calculated on a ‘radial’ basis, except in the case of Secondary Signing for Major Attractions – this second distance will be taken as a ‘cardinal’ direction – (point of compass).
 * Inter-Provincial Highways are highways; 1, 2, 3, 4, 16, 43, 49 & 63/28

  1. Facility signs may be incorporated into overhead or ground-mounted directional (green) sign systems.
  2. Limited to the attractions displayed on the Community Attraction & Facility Sign, located at the community limits
    or community access.
  3. Tourist destination areas located within 1 km of an Inter-Provincial Highway are allowed advance signs on the
    Inter-Provincial Highway up to 10 km in advance of the highway access, in each travel direction.
  4. If there are no Major Highways within 15 km of a Major Attraction, directional signs may be placed at the closest
    Major Highway within 40km.
  5. If there are no major highways within 15 km of a Regular Attraction, directional signs may be placed at the closest
    Major Highway within 40 km from the attraction site, in one direction only (this being a cardinal direction). If there
    are no Major Highways within 40 km of a Regular Attraction, directional signs are permitted at each Minor
    Highway access within 15 km of the facility site, in each direction.
  6. For Major Attractions, the majority of customers must reside greater than 80 km for the attraction.

Logo Sign Placement Criteria

Logo signs are placed inside the highway right-of-way at the entrance to communities, in advance of community access roads, and at commercial service roads located adjacent to the highway. Logo signs advise motorists of gas, food and lodging services next to the highway. Generally, logos are only permitted in advance of small communities. In large communities and in rural areas, logos may be placed at commercial service road entrances. The criteria for Logo Sign placement are outlined in Table 5.

Table 5: Logo Signs Placement on Highways

Notes:

  1. Logo signs are permitted on highways for communities within 8 km from an major highway, that have Community Attraction Facility signs in place.
  2. Logo Signs only are only permitted on a Minor Highway, that has Community Attractions and Facility signs in place in advance of the community, if the community is more than 8 km from a major highway.
  3. Service Centre must have at least two services available in the FOOD, GAS or LODGING categories, and must be located within one kilometre from the a highway that is posted greater than 70 km/h. The facility location must clearly fall within a rural area outside any corporate/municipal boundary.
  4. Signs in rural areas approaching communities are included under “Small Communities” in the table.
  5. No Logos signs are permitted on ring roads (Highway 201 and Highway 216) or Deerfoot Trail.

Community Attractions and Facility Signs (Small Communities < 25,000 Population)

Small communities with population less than 25,000 (but greater than 100) are permitted to erect a sign at their highway entrance or at their highway access, depicting the significant attractions and facilities within their community. The community administration chooses which attractions and facilities will represent their community. The Community Attractions and Facility Sign consists of a blue panel where up to four (4) attractions may be displayed, representing the main attractions within the community that visitors should see while visiting. Examples may include historic sites, unique displays (world’s largest egg), cultural centers, significant tours, etc.

Small communities have the option to place up to six (6) general facility tabs, blue in colour, to represent the facilities available within the community. Facilities that are displayed are generally
public or community oriented in nature (example; community recreation centre). Police (blue) and hospital (green) service symbols must be shown on the sign if they exist within the community, and Alberta Transportation will provide the hospital and police service symbols at no cost. The community may choose the remaining facilities to be displayed on the sign. A blue “All Services” panel may be used in lieu of the six facility tabs, if the community has the following services available: Hospital, Police, Information, Gas, Food, Lodging, Camping, Propane, and Trailer Dump.

Where Logo Signs are placed on the highway, the Community Attractions and Facility Sign is placed immediately upstream of the Logo Signs to indicate the name of the community in which
motorists can expect the gas, food and lodging services displayed on the Logo Signs.

Community Attraction and Facility Signs may be placed on any highway, 1 km in advance of the community limits. If placement is difficult due to the abundance of signs in the entrance area, the sign may be placed 2 km in advance of the community.

Community Attraction and Facility Signs may be placed on major highways in advance of a community access, for communities within 8 km of a major highway. Signage is only permitted on the closest major highway in these cases.

Supplementary TODS Sign Placement Within Communities

Communities may request supplementary signs for services/attractions within their respective community. Typically these supplementary signs are the Type C sign configuration displaying the appropriate IC symbol with a directional arrow. Where a provincial highway enters the community, Police, Hospital, Tourist Information facilities and tourist attractions displayed on the middle panel board of the CAF sign would qualify for supplementary signage along the provincial highway right of way within the community at the intersection leading to the facility.

Supplementary signs will also be permitted for stand-alone facilities (mainly of interest to tourists and unfamiliar drivers) that request directional guidance. The location of this facility shall not be visible from the highway. Supplementary signs will be restricted to the intended facilities on the symbol panel board and tourist attractions displayed on the middle panel board of the Community Attractions and Facility (CAF) sign. If the CAF sign contains an “All Services” panel, there is no limit to the number of qualifying facility types. The eligible facilities will be restricted to the approved symbols/services found in the Alberta Transportation sign catalogue of highway signs. The local municipality and/or attraction owner will be the applicant for all the supplementary sign requests.

Approvals for the supplementary signs will follow the Tourism Highway Signage Program process. As per normal, operational and safety issues will need to be addressed/reviewed prior to any approvals being issued. In the areas where the placement of TODS causes an operational or safety problem, as determined by the District Operations Manager, the sign will not be permitted, or the request will be placed on hold until the operational or safety problem can be resolved.

Businesses qualifying for signage under the Logos program will not be eligible for supplementary signs.

Tourist Areas

Currently, there are 23 Tourist Destination Marketing Organizations (DMO’s) in Alberta whose key role is to market tourism in their area. Each DMO has distinct tourist attractions and facilities within their area that are actively marketed through tourism publications and travel brochures.

Blue signs will be permitted within the highway right-of-way on major highways at each entrance into the Destination Marketing Organization area, welcoming travelers who are entering this new tourist area. Tourist area signs will also be permitted signifying other government recognized tourist areas in the province.

The online Application is the easiest way to determine your eligibility.

For further details on eligibility requirements, please Contact Us.